Diamidinophenylindole
Neurobiology graduate and lover of all things anatomy.

Content included: personal and PhD business, olympic weightlifting and a particular focus in science.

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Because what else is there on a sunny park than playing with your cellphone.

#personal#silly
Because what else is there on a sunny park than playing with your cellphone.

bpod-mrc:

22 July 2014

Retinal Restoration

There’s currently no cure for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of inherited eye diseases that impair the retina’s ability to respond to light, resulting in gradual loss of vision. But now, researchers have used stem cells to develop a promising experimental treatment. First they reprogrammed skin cells from RP patients into stem cells to make patient-specific retinal cells for closer inspection. They found that mutations in a gene called MFRP disrupt the production of actin (red), a protein that provides scaffolding for retinal cells. When this structure doesn’t form properly (left), retinal cells don’t work very well. But when the team used a virus to smuggle in a working copy of MFRP, the structure was restored (right). And in mice with an RP-like condition, the treatment slowly improved vision. It’s early days yet but these results show how patient-specific stem cells can kick start the development of tailor-made therapies.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Stephen Tsang and colleagues
Columbia University Medical Center, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in Molecular Therapy, July 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

22 July 2014
Retinal Restoration
There’s currently no cure for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of inherited eye diseases that impair the retina’s ability to respond to light, resulting in gradual loss of vision. But now, researchers have used stem cells to develop a promising experimental treatment. First they reprogrammed skin cells from RP patients into stem cells to make patient-specific retinal cells for closer inspection. They found that mutations in a gene called MFRP disrupt the production of actin (red), a protein that provides scaffolding for retinal cells. When this structure doesn’t form properly (left), retinal cells don’t work very well. But when the team used a virus to smuggle in a working copy of MFRP, the structure was restored (right). And in mice with an RP-like condition, the treatment slowly improved vision. It’s early days yet but these results show how patient-specific stem cells can kick start the development of tailor-made therapies.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Stephen Tsang and colleaguesColumbia University Medical Center, USAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in Molecular Therapy, July 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook
❝ The best way to get a girl strong is to feed her bacon in between sets

— Glenn Pendlay when chocolate-covered bacon was brought into the gym before training (via eternalathlete)

Sunny.

#personal
Sunny.

I give journal club tomorrow morning and I haven’t even read the paper. Fuck yeah last minute person much?

Did you know a flower placed in highlighter fluid can absorb the fluorescent ink into its leaves and petals? Shining a black light onto it then reveals a delicate network of glowing veins. The colours in this amazing image by Boaz Ng are natural.

source 

(Source: scienceyoucanlove)


Did you know a flower placed in highlighter fluid can absorb the fluorescent ink into its leaves and petals? Shining a black light onto it then reveals a delicate network of glowing veins. The colours in this amazing image by Boaz Ng are natural.
source 

Electrophysiology lab pantyhose.

#personal#lab life
Electrophysiology lab pantyhose.

light-blue-smurf:

Apoptosis. 

Activation of caspase-3 (green). The nucleus is shown in blue.

light-blue-smurf:

Apoptosis. 
Activation of caspase-3 (green). The nucleus is shown in blue.

inothernews:

LOOK — CLING ONS A Bennett’s feather star (Oxycomanthus bennetti) holds up its arms to trap food, as it clings to a harp gorgonian (Ctenocella pectinata) off Lizard Island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.  (Photo: Fred Bavendam / Corbis via The Guardian)

Click through to see The Guardian’s excellent photo gallery, “The Great Barrier Reef We Stand to Lose.”

inothernews:

LOOK — CLING ONS A Bennett’s feather star (Oxycomanthus bennetti) holds up its arms to trap food, as it clings to a harp gorgonian (Ctenocella pectinata) off Lizard Island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.  (Photo: Fred Bavendam / Corbis via The Guardian)
Click through to see The Guardian’s excellent photo gallery, “The Great Barrier Reef We Stand to Lose.”

thecacklingtauren:

Things I love about doing data analysis

  • Nothing
  • Nada
  • Zilch
  • Nil
  • Zero

how do i stop growing up this isn’t fun anymore

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

As if we needed another reason to appreciate how amazing bees are: Artist and beekeeper Ren Ri makes breathtaking sculptures using plastic, salvaged wood, and a swarm of bees.

Well, to be fair, the bees did half the work :)

muuficom:

polymethacrylate droplets by FEI Company on Flickr.

A través de Flickr:
polymethacrylate droplets

Courtesy of Mr. MUHAMMET AYDIN

Image Details
Instrument used: Quanta SEM
Magnification: 8000
Voltage: 2
Spot: 3.5
Working Distance: 7
Detector: lfd

muuficom:

polymethacrylate droplets by FEI Company on Flickr.A través de Flickr:
polymethacrylate dropletsCourtesy of Mr. MUHAMMET AYDINImage DetailsInstrument used: Quanta SEMMagnification:  8000Voltage:  2Spot:  3.5Working Distance:  7Detector:  lfd