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Neurobiology graduate and lover of all things anatomy.

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neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Calcium imaging of neurons in a rat hippocampal slice through transparent graphene electrode. Black square at the center is transparent graphene electrode and neurons are shown in green. Yellow traces shows a representative example of electrophysiological recordings with graphene electrode. Credit: Hajime Takano and Duygu Kuzum)

See-Through, One-Atom-Thick, Carbon Electrodes are a Powerful Tool for Studying Epilepsy, Other Brain Disorders

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have used graphene — a two-dimensional form of carbon only one atom thick — to fabricate a new type of microelectrode that solves a major problem for investigators looking to understand the intricate circuitry of the brain.

Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other neurological disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors, using high-resolution optical imaging and electrophysiological recording. But traditional metallic microelectrodes are opaque and block the clinician’s view and create shadows that can obscure important details. In the past, researchers could obtain either high-resolution optical images or electrophysiological data, but not both at the same time.

The Center for NeuroEngineering and Therapeutics (CNT), under the leadership of senior author Brian Litt, PhD, has solved this problem with the development of a completely transparent graphene microelectrode that allows for simultaneous optical imaging and electrophysiological recordings of neural circuits. Their work was published this week in Nature Communications.

"There are technologies that can give very high spatial resolution such as calcium imaging; there are technologies that can give high temporal resolution, such as electrophysiology, but there’s no single technology that can provide both," says study co-first-author Duygu Kuzum, PhD. Along with co-author Hajime Takano, PhD, and their colleagues, Kuzum notes that the team developed a neuroelectrode technology based on graphene to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously. 

Aside from the obvious benefits of its transparency, graphene offers other advantages: “It can act as an anti-corrosive for metal surfaces to eliminate all corrosive electrochemical reactions in tissues,” Kuzum says. “It’s also inherently a low-noise material, which is important in neural recording because we try to get a high signal-to-noise ratio.”          

While previous efforts have been made to construct transparent electrodes using indium tin oxide, they are expensive and highly brittle, making that substance ill-suited for microelectrode arrays. “Another advantage of graphene is that it’s flexible, so we can make very thin, flexible electrodes that can hug the neural tissue,” Kuzum notes.

In the study, Litt, Kuzum, and their colleagues performed calcium imaging of hippocampal slices in a rat model with both confocal and two-photon microscopy, while also conducting electrophysiological recordings. On an individual cell level, they were able to observe temporal details of seizures and seizure-like activity with very high resolution. The team also notes that the single-electrode techniques used in the Nature Communications study could be easily adapted to study other larger areas of the brain with more expansive arrays.

The graphene microelectrodes developed could have wider application. “They can be used in any application that we need to record electrical signals, such as cardiac pacemakers or peripheral nervous system stimulators,” says Kuzum. Because of graphene’s nonmagnetic and anti-corrosive properties, these probes “can also be a very promising technology to increase the longevity of neural implants.” Graphene’s nonmagnetic characteristics also allow for safe, artifact-free MRI reading, unlike metallic implants.

Kuzum emphasizes that the transparent graphene microelectrode technology was achieved through an interdisciplinary effort of CNT and the departments of Neuroscience, Pediatrics, and Materials Science at Penn and the division of Neurology at CHOP.

Ertugrul Cubukcu’s lab at Materials Science and Engineering Department helped with the graphene processing technology used in fabricating flexible transparent neural electrodes, as well as performing optical and materials characterization in collaboration with Euijae Shim and Jason Reed. The simultaneous imaging and recording experiments involving calcium imaging with confocal and two photon microscopy was performed at Douglas Coulter‘s Lab at CHOP with Hajime Takano.  In vivo recording experiments were performed in collaboration with Halvor Juul in Marc Dichters Lab. Somatosensory stimulation response experiments were done in collaboration with Timothy Lucas’s Lab, Julius De Vries, and Andrew Richardson.

As the technology is further developed and used, Kuzum and her colleagues expect to gain greater insight into how the physiology of the brain can go awry. “It can provide information on neural circuits, which wasn’t available before, because we didn’t have the technology to probe them,” she says. That information may include the identification of specific marker waveforms of brain electrical activity that can be mapped spatially and temporally to individual neural circuits. “We can also look at other neurological disorders and try to understand the correlation between different neural circuits using this technique,” she says.

So exciting!! eeeerrrggggg

#Science
neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Calcium imaging of neurons in a rat hippocampal slice through transparent graphene electrode. Black square at the center is transparent graphene electrode and neurons are shown in green. Yellow traces shows a representative example of electrophysiological recordings with graphene electrode. Credit: Hajime Takano and Duygu Kuzum)
See-Through, One-Atom-Thick, Carbon Electrodes are a Powerful Tool for Studying Epilepsy, Other Brain Disorders
Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have used graphene — a two-dimensional form of carbon only one atom thick — to fabricate a new type of microelectrode that solves a major problem for investigators looking to understand the intricate circuitry of the brain.
Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other neurological disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors, using high-resolution optical imaging and electrophysiological recording. But traditional metallic microelectrodes are opaque and block the clinician’s view and create shadows that can obscure important details. In the past, researchers could obtain either high-resolution optical images or electrophysiological data, but not both at the same time.
The Center for NeuroEngineering and Therapeutics (CNT), under the leadership of senior author Brian Litt, PhD, has solved this problem with the development of a completely transparent graphene microelectrode that allows for simultaneous optical imaging and electrophysiological recordings of neural circuits. Their work was published this week in Nature Communications.
"There are technologies that can give very high spatial resolution such as calcium imaging; there are technologies that can give high temporal resolution, such as electrophysiology, but there’s no single technology that can provide both," says study co-first-author Duygu Kuzum, PhD. Along with co-author Hajime Takano, PhD, and their colleagues, Kuzum notes that the team developed a neuroelectrode technology based on graphene to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously. 
Aside from the obvious benefits of its transparency, graphene offers other advantages: “It can act as an anti-corrosive for metal surfaces to eliminate all corrosive electrochemical reactions in tissues,” Kuzum says. “It’s also inherently a low-noise material, which is important in neural recording because we try to get a high signal-to-noise ratio.”          
While previous efforts have been made to construct transparent electrodes using indium tin oxide, they are expensive and highly brittle, making that substance ill-suited for microelectrode arrays. “Another advantage of graphene is that it’s flexible, so we can make very thin, flexible electrodes that can hug the neural tissue,” Kuzum notes.
In the study, Litt, Kuzum, and their colleagues performed calcium imaging of hippocampal slices in a rat model with both confocal and two-photon microscopy, while also conducting electrophysiological recordings. On an individual cell level, they were able to observe temporal details of seizures and seizure-like activity with very high resolution. The team also notes that the single-electrode techniques used in the Nature Communications study could be easily adapted to study other larger areas of the brain with more expansive arrays.
The graphene microelectrodes developed could have wider application. “They can be used in any application that we need to record electrical signals, such as cardiac pacemakers or peripheral nervous system stimulators,” says Kuzum. Because of graphene’s nonmagnetic and anti-corrosive properties, these probes “can also be a very promising technology to increase the longevity of neural implants.” Graphene’s nonmagnetic characteristics also allow for safe, artifact-free MRI reading, unlike metallic implants.
Kuzum emphasizes that the transparent graphene microelectrode technology was achieved through an interdisciplinary effort of CNT and the departments of Neuroscience, Pediatrics, and Materials Science at Penn and the division of Neurology at CHOP.
Ertugrul Cubukcu’s lab at Materials Science and Engineering Department helped with the graphene processing technology used in fabricating flexible transparent neural electrodes, as well as performing optical and materials characterization in collaboration with Euijae Shim and Jason Reed. The simultaneous imaging and recording experiments involving calcium imaging with confocal and two photon microscopy was performed at Douglas Coulter‘s Lab at CHOP with Hajime Takano.  In vivo recording experiments were performed in collaboration with Halvor Juul in Marc Dichter’s Lab. Somatosensory stimulation response experiments were done in collaboration with Timothy Lucas’s Lab, Julius De Vries, and Andrew Richardson.
As the technology is further developed and used, Kuzum and her colleagues expect to gain greater insight into how the physiology of the brain can go awry. “It can provide information on neural circuits, which wasn’t available before, because we didn’t have the technology to probe them,” she says. That information may include the identification of specific marker waveforms of brain electrical activity that can be mapped spatially and temporally to individual neural circuits. “We can also look at other neurological disorders and try to understand the correlation between different neural circuits using this technique,” she says.

So exciting!! eeeerrrggggg

bpod-mrc:

21 October 2014

Beta Supply Line

People with type-1 diabetes inject insulin to regulate blood-sugar levels because their immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. It’s possible to make beta cells from stem cells, which can turn into almost any type of cell. But producing beta cells that work as well as the real thing and in sufficient quantities has been a struggle. Now, researchers have found a way to make fully functioning beta cells in the hundreds of millions required for cell-replacement therapy. When the beta cells (pictured) were transplanted into diabetic mice, they quickly began secreting insulin in response to glucose and relieved symptoms in two weeks. Human trials are still years away, but creating a renewable supply is a significant achievement. The challenge now is to perfect these lab-made beta cells and develop an encapsulation method to protect them from the patient’s immune system.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Doug Melton
Harvard University, USA
Copyright held by original authors
Research published in Cell, October 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

21 October 2014
Beta Supply Line
People with type-1 diabetes inject insulin to regulate blood-sugar levels because their immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. It’s possible to make beta cells from stem cells, which can turn into almost any type of cell. But producing beta cells that work as well as the real thing and in sufficient quantities has been a struggle. Now, researchers have found a way to make fully functioning beta cells in the hundreds of millions required for cell-replacement therapy. When the beta cells (pictured) were transplanted into diabetic mice, they quickly began secreting insulin in response to glucose and relieved symptoms in two weeks. Human trials are still years away, but creating a renewable supply is a significant achievement. The challenge now is to perfect these lab-made beta cells and develop an encapsulation method to protect them from the patient’s immune system.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Doug MeltonHarvard University, USA Copyright held by original authorsResearch published in Cell, October 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

belyenochi:

Seriy.

belyenochi:

Seriy.

mycitral:

The Orion Nebula HD [9000x9000] via /r/spaceporn

mycitral:

The Orion Nebula HD [9000x9000] via /r/spaceporn

(Source: milkyytea)

(Source: studioghifli)

vvaterblogged:

Syoin Kajii - Nami

rainbowsparklekittens:

REMEMBERING ALL YOUR NEGLECTED RESPONSIBILITIES AT ONCE LIKE

image

(Source: rainbowsnowflakekittens)

Being at the lab at 08:30 and finishing reading papers at 23:30 is my absolute favourite - SAID NO ONE EVER.

Bring it.

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy

"Have you ever wondered what a human spinal nerve looks from the inside? Here in this electron micrograph you can see it!"

SEM Print by Thomas Deerinck, Ncmir

(Source: brains-and-bodies)

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy



"Have you ever wondered what a human spinal nerve looks from the inside? Here in this electron micrograph you can see it!"


SEM Print by Thomas Deerinck, Ncmir